Board of Commissioners Meetings

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While social distancing measures are in place due to COVID-19, the Three Rivers Park District Board of Commissioners is meeting remotely in order to best ensure the safety of Park District staff and the public. Although Board meetings aren't currently being held in person at the Three Rivers Park District Administrative Center, the Board of Commissioners is committed to keeping people informed about the Board's policy making process and providing opportunities for people to comment in advance about proposed Board actions.


Watch live and comment during meetings

Board meetings and Study Sessions are streamed live via Zoom. If you would like to watch the live video stream of the Board Meeting, please email your full name, email address and phone number to BoardComments@threeriversparks.org by 5:00 p.m. on the Wednesday before the meeting, and a link to the meeting will be sent to you. Please indicate in your email if you would like to address the Board during Item 4C. Citizens Wishing to Address the Board (for items not on the agenda; please include topic) or specify the agenda item number you wish to address.


Submit comments

If you would like to submit written comments in advance of the Board Meeting that will be shared with the Board, please email them to BoardComments@threeriversparks.org by 5:00 p.m. on the Wednesday before the meeting or post them below in the comment box under the agenda item you wish to address. The agenda for the upcoming Board Meeting is now available for review within the Meeting Archive.

Click here for an archive of past Board agendas, minutes and audio recordings of meetings.

While social distancing measures are in place due to COVID-19, the Three Rivers Park District Board of Commissioners is meeting remotely in order to best ensure the safety of Park District staff and the public. Although Board meetings aren't currently being held in person at the Three Rivers Park District Administrative Center, the Board of Commissioners is committed to keeping people informed about the Board's policy making process and providing opportunities for people to comment in advance about proposed Board actions.


Watch live and comment during meetings

Board meetings and Study Sessions are streamed live via Zoom. If you would like to watch the live video stream of the Board Meeting, please email your full name, email address and phone number to BoardComments@threeriversparks.org by 5:00 p.m. on the Wednesday before the meeting, and a link to the meeting will be sent to you. Please indicate in your email if you would like to address the Board during Item 4C. Citizens Wishing to Address the Board (for items not on the agenda; please include topic) or specify the agenda item number you wish to address.


Submit comments

If you would like to submit written comments in advance of the Board Meeting that will be shared with the Board, please email them to BoardComments@threeriversparks.org by 5:00 p.m. on the Wednesday before the meeting or post them below in the comment box under the agenda item you wish to address. The agenda for the upcoming Board Meeting is now available for review within the Meeting Archive.

Click here for an archive of past Board agendas, minutes and audio recordings of meetings.

  • February 18, 2021 Board Meeting Agenda

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    18 Feb 2021
    CLOSED: This discussion has concluded.

    To view the agenda for the February 18, 2021, Regular Board Meeting, click here.

  • Item 4A. Special Matters: Acknowledgement of Donations

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    18 Feb 2021
    CLOSED: This discussion has concluded.

    Superintendent’s Recommendation:

    NO ACTION REQUIRED.


    Background:

    Commissioners and/or staff are encouraged to report any special matters, awards, recognitions, or other acknowledgements at this time.

    Acknowledgement of Donations

    The Board wishes to acknowledge the following donations and grants to the Park District of $500 or more during the month of January 2021.

    Tom Brix: $500 to plant a Sugar Maple at Noerenberg Gardens in memory of Martha Brix

    Steve Kravchenko: $1,000 for a bench at Carver Park Reserve in memory of Julie Lizak

    Michael and Patsy Langanki: $1,000 for wherever it is needed most

    Russell McCandless:$1,750 for the First Tee

  • Item 4B. Superintendent’s Report

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    18 Feb 2021
    CLOSED: This discussion has concluded.

    Superintendent’s Recommendation:

    NO ACTION REQUIRED; THIS ITEM IS FOR INFORMATION AND DISCUSSION.


    Background:

  • Item 4C. Citizens Wishing to Address the Board

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    18 Feb 2021
    CLOSED: This discussion has concluded.

    Board meetings are streamed live via Zoom. If you would like to watch the live video stream of the Board meeting, please email your full name, email address and phone number to BoardComments@threeriversparks.org by 5:00 p.m. on the Wednesday before the meeting, and a link to the meeting will be sent to you. Please indicate in your email if you would like to address the Board during Item 4C. Citizens Wishing to Address the Board (for items not on the agenda; please include topic) or specify the agenda item number you wish to address.

    If you would like to submit written comments in advance of the Board meeting that will be shared with the Board, please email them to BoardComments@threeriversparks.org by 5:00 p.m. on the Wednesday before the meeting.

  • Items 5A - 5F. Routine Business

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    18 Feb 2021
    CLOSED: This discussion has concluded.

    All matters listed under Routine Business are considered to be standard items by the Board of Commissioners and will be enacted by one motion. For more information about the items listed under Routine Business, please visit the Meeting Archive.

    Item 5A. Award of Construction and Construction Administration Contracts for the Baker-Carver Regional Trail Project, Carver Park Reserve Segment

    MOTION TO AWARD CONTRACTS FOR THE BAKER-CARVER REGIONAL TRAIL, CARVER PARK SEGMENT AT CARVER PARK RESERVE TO:

    • LANDWEHR CONSTRUCTION, INC. FOR CONSTRUCTION, IN THE TOTAL BASE BID AMOUNT OF $786,636.45; AND
    • SRF CONSULTING GROUP FOR PROFESSIONAL CONSTRUCTION ADMINISTRATION SERVICES, IN THE TOTAL HOURLY NOT-TO-EXCEED FEE AMOUNT OF $113,205.00

    AND ESTABLISH A TEN PERCENT CONTINGENCY ALLOWANCE WITH TOTAL PROJECT FINANCING FROM THE BOARD APPROVED PROJECT BUDGET IN THE 2018 AND 2019 ASSET MANAGEMENT PROGRAM.


    Item 5B. Purchase of Services Agreement with the Conservation Corps of Minnesota (CCM) for March 1, 2021 through December 31, 2021

    MOTION TO AUTHORIZE THE BOARD CHAIR AND SUPERINTENDENT TO ENTER INTO TWO SERVICE CONTRACTS WITH THE CONSERVATION CORPS OF MINNESOTA (CCM) FOR THE PERIOD OF March 1, 2021 THROUGH DECEMBER 31, 2021 AT A COST NOT TO EXCEED $504,000 WITH FUNDING DESIGNATED THROUGH THE 2021 ASSET MANAGEMENT PROGRAM.


    Item 5C. Mn River Bluffs Regional Trail Winter Use Permit - Chanhassen

    MOTION TO APPROVE WINTER USE PERMIT FOR 2020-2021 FOR THE CITY OF CHANHASSEN TO CONDUCT WINTER MAINTENANCE ON THE SEGMENT OF MINNESOTA BLUFFS LRT REGIONAL TRAIL WITHIN THE CITY’S JURISDICTION AND IN ACCORDANCE WITH THE PARK DISTRICT’S WINTER USE PERMIT.


    Item 5D. Nokomis-MN River Regional Trail: Richfield Detour and Access Permit

    MOTION TO AUTHORIZE THE SUPERINTENDENT TO GRANT A TEMPORARY ACCESS PERMIT TO EAGLE BUILDING COMPANY FOR USE OF THE NOKOMIS-MN RIVER REGIONAL TRAIL IN RICHFIELD BETWEEN 16TH AVENUE SOUTH AND EAST 65TH STREET.


    Item 5E. Minutes of the January 7, 2021, Regular Board Meeting

    MOTION TO APPROVE THE MINUTES OF THE JANUARY 7, 2021, REGULAR BOARD MEETING.


    Item 5F. Approval of Claims for the Period Ended February 11, 2021

    MOTION TO APPROVE PAYMENT OF CLAIMS AS RECOMMENDED BY THE SUPERINTENDENT FOR THE PERIOD ENDED FEBRUARY 11, 2021, IN THE AMOUNT OF $12,150,912.73.

  • Item 6A. COVID Lessons Learned – Digital Content Featuring The Wandering Naturalist Podcast

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    18 Feb 2021
    CLOSED: This discussion has concluded.

    Superintendent's Recommendation:

    NO ACTION REQUIRED; THIS ITEM IS FOR INFORMATION AND DISCUSSION.


    The following information was prepared by Mandy Whiteside, Director of Marketing and Community Engagement.

    Background:

    Often times technology is seen as competition for connecting people to nature – drawing people inside and focused on a screen instead of outside to experience nature first-hand. While park and trail visitation numbers over the past year show that the COVID-19 pandemic has helped many people reprioritize and rediscover recreation in nature, it has also caused us to re-think and re-focus how we educate and share information with the community.

    While staff around the Park District have been committed to developing creative and engaging ways to share information and connect people to our parks through technology for several years, 2020 was a banner year for expanding reach and opportunities.

    In the coming months, more information on lessons learned throughout the pandemic will be shared, and technology will likely be a part of each one, but the goal with this update is to provide a high-level overview of how staff utilized technology to educate and keep people connected to nature when traditional in-person learning opportunities were scarce.


    Three Rivers Website

    Redesigned in 2017, the Three Rivers website is focused on highlighting the various facilities and activities available throughout the Park District with engaging visuals, an interactive map and detailed descriptions. It was developed to be a mobile-friendly, user-focused source of information about Three Rivers.

    Starting in March 2020, the website became an even more vital resource for people to learn about all that Three Rivers has offer, to see how operations were changing and to discover what was currently available. Traffic to the website was record setting in 2020, receiving more than 6.5 million unique page views, an increase of 48% over 2019. In the site’s history, the top five months for web traffic are all from 2020, with December being the busiest at 565,487 unique views.

    Staff continually add new information to the website, adapting to the questions and needs of the community. Some of this new information included detailed COVID operations, current activity status, restroom locations and monthly program offerings. The website also became an aggregate of virtual program offerings being offered across the Park District.


    Virtual Program Offerings

    Staff throughout the Outdoor Education and Recreation (OER) department quickly and creatively developed new models for delivering programs when in-person offerings were not widely available. Throughout the pandemic, programs have been delivered broadly via social media, through public offerings, and school-based learning.

    • Staff have utilized many tools, including Facebook Live, Zoom, Google Meets and QR codes to deliver this content. More than 65,000 visitor connections have occurred through Facebook video content, providing a virtual replacement for traditional drop-in programs.
    • Adults have been eager to register for virtual program offerings and have appreciated the convenience of joining online so they don’t have to worry about traffic, work or childcare issues. In 2020, staff reached nearly 1,200 participants through virtual public programs.
    • While schools have been fluctuating between distance, hybrid and in-person learning models, the opportunities for traditional fieldtrips and in-classroom visits have not been feasible. OER staff connected with 23,290 students virtually in 2020. While not the numbers of a typical school year, the interest continues to grow and the response from participating schools has been overwhelmingly positive.


    Three Rivers Blog

    The Park District blog launched on August 1, 2018. The vision of the blog was to increase awareness of environmental, educational and event-based features Three Rivers offers and to promote environmental stewardship to a broader audience. Blog posts are published at least weekly, typically on Mondays, publishing 149 posts to date.

    During the pandemic, we have seen the readership of the blog grow exponentially. January 2021 was the biggest month to date with 26,511 unique views – that's a 237% increase over January 2020! Over the past year, readers especially engaged with posts related to the ‘Best places for…’ winter hiking, snowshoeing, quiet parks, fall colors, etc.

    Through its algorithms, Google will highlight different content as visual snippets. In the eyes of Google, these snippets represent quality content from reliable sources. The Three Rivers blog has established itself as reliable content, as we are consistently appearing as snippets in more search results.

    While many people have contributed to and authored blog posts, the core content and editing team is Erin Korsmo, Website Coordinator; Andrea Breitung, Marketing & Communications Specialist; and Alyssa Schauer, Digital Marketing Assistant. In May 2020, the Three Rivers Blog won a Northern Lights Merit Award from the MN Association of Government Communicators.


    To view a PDF of this information, including the Google Snippet image referenced above, click here.

    The Wandering Naturalist Podcast

    Debuting in January 2019, Three Rivers’ podcast, The Wandering Naturalist, is now starting its third season. The podcast concept was developed with a goal to educate listeners about natural history topics relevant to Three Rivers. It strives to include and amplify diverse perspectives and voices around a given topic each month. The idea started with Brandon Baker, a naturalist at Eastman Nature Center, and grew into a multi-department project. The content focus of The Wandering Naturalist fills a unique niche that has not yet been covered regularly by any other podcast.

    To date, the podcast has released 76 episodes and has received 56,263 unique downloads. Three episodes related to the same topic are released on the first Wednesday of each month. It has an international audience, having been downloaded in 13 different countries.

    The podcast is hosted by Brandon Baker and Angela Grill, Wildlife Biologist. The two of them layout the editorial calendar and identify the guests for each season. Tom Knisely, Media Relations Specialist, serves as the producer, working closely with the production studio staff at Studio Americana. The podcast has expanded its social media presence to boost engagement, and a team of naturalists (Monica Rauchwarter, Richardson; Allie Gams Beeson, Richardson; and Ashley Smith, Mississippi Gateway) manage the social content supporting each topic throughout the month. Michelle Davis, a local artist and fan of the podcast, recently reached out to the social media team inquiring if she could produce monthly cover art for each topic. These beautiful and unique pieces enhance the launch each month.

    The editorial calendar is developed in the summer and all interviews are recorded and edited between November – March, the time of year when Brandon and Angela are in the field less and have more flexibility. Final tweaks and natural sounds are added in the months ahead of release.

    The podcast is a unique content tool at Three Rivers and exemplifies leading by example. In November 2020, The Wandering Naturalist received a Digital Media Award from the National Association for Interpretation.

    During the Board meeting, Brandon, Angela and Tom will join to share some of their highlights, stories and lessons learned from working on the podcast.


    Relationship to the System Plan

    The Request for Action supports the following goals(s) of the System Plan:

    • Goal 1: You Belong Here
    • Goal 2: Parks Matter
    • Goal 3: Lead by Example
  • Item 6B. Mississippi Gateway Regional Park Redevelopment Project Scope Confirmation and Public Communications & Engagement Plan Review

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    18 Feb 2021
    CLOSED: This discussion has concluded.

    Superintendent's Recommendation:

    NO ACTION REQUIRED; THIS ITEM IS FOR INFORMATION AND DISCUSSION.


    Prepared by Jason Zemke, Senior Manager of Architecture, Matt Swenson, Project Manager and Jason McGrew-King, Intergovernmental Relations & Communications Supervisor.


    Background:

    At the December 3, 2020 Board study session, staff presented a refresher on the Mississippi Gateway Park Redevelopment project components and proposed process, introduced key project team members, and confirmed Board’s level of engagement at key milestones throughout the project’s schedule (Reference 6B-1).

    Since that meeting, Design Project Managers have been busy working with project team members, City of Brooklyn Park, and senior management to finalize the project’s scope. If the project scope aligns with Commissioners’ goals, staff will work with consultants over the next month to finalize contracts for consideration at the March Board meeting.

    Over the past two months, Marketing and Community Engagement staff have also developed the project’s DRAFT Public Communications Plan in collaboration with project team members, Brooklyn Park staff, and the Senior Management Group.

    Staff is looking for feedback on both the Project Scope as well as the Public Communications and Engagement Plan at this meeting.


    Project Scope:

    The attached DRAFT scoping document (Reference 6B-2) outlines the final project scope requirements, in accordance with the master plan and project team input, for each of the major components for the park redevelopment:

    • Mississippi Gateway Center
    • Welcome Plaza
    • Mini-Mississippi River Play & Education Feature
    • Nature’s Highline
    • South Pond Learning Station


    The project scope of work for the remainder of the park is also summarized in the scoping document and in accordance with the master plan.

    Noteworthy topics related to the major project components are as follows:

    Mississippi Gateway Center: The Gateway Center is intended to live up to its namesake and be the gateway to nature, to the river, and to the Park District. The target audience is for those people who are in the Try It and Learn It stage of the System Plan’s Visitor Experience Model. The Gateway Center is envisioned as a vibrant, bustling place, yet welcoming for multi-generational families. Exhibits will be focused on the river and the park and will be geared toward the interests of all ages. Large classroom spaces will serve programming and conference needs for schools and community groups, without disturbing users of the educational exhibit space. Besides overlook views of the river and direct connections to the Nature’s Highline, an important feature of the Gateway Center is the ‘Messy’ Classroom and Equipment Rental Space. These are two spaces that will provide recreational education along with the ability for a new user to rent or try out the equipment for immediate use within the park. Lastly, the Gateway Center will house the Outreach Hub staff offices – Mississippi Gateway will be the ‘home base’ for the Outreach staff and studio to conduct remote learning programs – bringing the parks to the people.

    Welcome Plaza: The Welcome Plaza will be the front door to the Gateway Center and will accommodate a higher level of activity than is currently found at the entry to the existing visitor center. For this reason, design should include elements that allow this plaza to function actively year-round and not just during the warmer months.

    Mini-Mississippi River Play & Education Feature: The Master Plan’s vision for this feature is that it be a learning opportunity through play, where kids can manipulate water flow and experience river channels up close. The project team desires a feature that incorporates play through opportunities for kids to get their feet wet and will further explore the potential for this through design.

    South Pond Learning Station: This facility is intended to provide programming in a rustic, remote outdoor classroom setting, but is located in the floodplain forest where it could be inaccessible at certain times of the year due to flooding. Flooded situations would offer unique opportunities to learn about, and experience, the dynamic nature of the river up close. As such, the Project Team will explore design options that could maintain safe access to the Learning Station at all times of the year.

    Nature’s Highline: This feature will be a regional draw and provide visitors with a unique perspective of the park’s landscape from within the tree canopy along the bluff line. Because the park is located in a community with a very diverse population and variety of languages, there may be challenges with the name given to this feature through the Master Plan process. The Project Team is concerned that many visitors whose first language is not English will either not understand the reference to New York’s Highline Trail or that the term itself will not translate as desired. Canopy Trail/Walkway, Treetop Trail/Walkway, or something similar may be more desirable and, with the Board’s support, we would like to explore a new name through the schematic design process.


    Public Communications and Engagement Plan:

    The attached DRAFT Public Communications and Engagement Plan (Reference 6B-3) outlines the intended approach for keeping the public informed throughout the duration of the project, as well as areas staff have identified for a higher level of public engagement.

    Highlights from the Plan include:

    Inform: During the three-year master plan process, extensive engagement with many stakeholders took place that shaped the content of the master plan that is now guiding this redevelopment project. As the project transitions to design and construction, communication with these same stakeholders will be primarily to generate excitement for the redevelopment of the park and provide regular project updates.

    Engage: The Project Team identified two opportunities to continue a higher level of engagement beyond what was covered during the Master Plan process.

    • Fishing Improvements: Project staff will meet with Park District staff who operate fishing programs and enjoy fishing as well as staff from partner agencies to learn their perspectives about fishing improvements that would enhance the experience at Mississippi Gateway. Staff will engage with fishing program participants and anglers who fish at the park and other Brooklyn Park locations through pop-up events to gain a better understanding of types and locations of improvements that they would find beneficial.
    • Nature-Based Play Features: Staff will leverage the strong relationship that the Park District has with a school near the park to provide an opportunity for students to learn about design and construction while offering input on the amenities that will make up the nature play components that are integrated along the canopy trail.


    Next Steps:

    Staff will be requesting award of a consultant contract at the March Board meeting.


    Relationship to the System Plan

    The Request for Action supports the following goals(s) of the System Plan:


    • Goal 1: You Belong Here
    • Goal 2: Parks Matter
    • Goal 3: Lead by Example
  • Item 6C. B3 Sustainability Requirements for Mississippi Gateway Center

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    18 Feb 2021
    CLOSED: This discussion has concluded.

    Superintendent's Recommendation:

    NO ACTION REQUIRED; THIS ITEM IS FOR INFORMATION AND DISCUSSION.


    Background:

    In 2004, the Center for Sustainable Building Research, University of Minnesota, developed sustainability guidelines for the design of new buildings or renovations, referred to as B3 Guidelines, which stands for “Buildings, Benchmarks, and Beyond.” B3 Guidelines provide sustainability goals for site, water, energy, indoor environment, materials and waste. The B3 Guidelines are required on all projects that receive general obligation funding (State Bonding) from the State of Minnesota.

    When the B3 Guidelines came out in 2004, the Park District recognized B3 Guidelines as a best practice for all building projects, regardless of funding source. The Guidelines have undergone several updates over the years, with the latest version being January 1, 2020. Examples of Park District buildings that were designed in accordance with and followed the full B3 Guidelines (B3) process are as follows:

    • Elm Creek Winter Recreation Area Chalet
    • Silverwood Visitor Center
    • Eastman Nature Center

    What B3 is and What B3 is Not:

    B3 is required for the Mississippi Gateway Center because of the $5M state bond funding source. B3 contains locally driven strategies that recognize Minnesota’s unique environmental factors such as soils, precipitation rates, natural resources, and climate. B3 is free to use and is accessed through an online web-based project documentation platform.

    B3 is just one of many sustainable building guidelines available for use in the construction industry. Well-known (and competing) industry programs such as LEED, Green Globes, Passive House, etc. are voluntary programs with an array of requirements, costs, and certifications. Each program has a particular methodology to guide design choices toward its version of a sustainable design. Sustainable guidelines generally contain requirements that are considered above and beyond typical practice and will result in additional project cost when compared to a non-guideline project. To counter increased costs, many requirements are intended to balance the initial costs with improved energy efficiency, reduced operation costs, and overall environmental and health benefits over the life of the building.

    B3 has been developed to be in alignment with other guidelines and rating systems (LEED, WELL Building Standard, others) when possible, even incorporating some of the same guideline thresholds. The benefits of this approach are to leverage the work of other guidelines, allow for dual compliance, and to make B3 readily accessible to designers with experience in other guidelines. However, compliance with other guidelines does not automatically equate to compliance with B3.

    B3 is not LEED, which is a widely recognized sustainable guideline in the US. Because of LEED’s popularity, it is worth briefly comparing B3 to LEED. LEED stands for Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design, by the US Green Building Council (USGBC). LEED’s methodology assigns a system of points for achievements in categories such as water efficiency, energy/atmosphere, materials/resources, etc. LEED awards one of four certifications, from ‘Certified’ to ‘Platinum’, depending on how many points are achieved. One way that B3 differs from LEED is that LEED does not require a minimum response to all requirements – some requirements may be ignored in the interests of pursuing other requirements. The other significant difference is that LEED is not free, requiring an extensive review process through the USGBC for certification.

    Lastly, B3 is not Net-zero, but it is getting there. Net-zero refers to the building’s ability to produce at least as much energy as it consumes over the course of a year. No sustainable guideline requires Net-zero design, but most incorporate some sort of an energy reduction standard. B3’s energy requirement is called Sustainable Building 2030 Energy Standard (SB 2030). SB 2030 is a progressive energy conservation scale, currently requiring an 80% reduction in energy use and carbon emissions compared to a standard code-based building. In 2025, the reduction will be 90%, and in 2030, the reduction will be 100%, or Net-zero. The progressive SB 2030 requirement recognizes that available technologies will become more efficient in time, making Net-zero more readily achievable by 2030. Regardless of technological advancements, a Net-zero building will always need some form of renewable energy and/or the purchase of carbon off-sets to balance the use of fossil fuels.

    B3 Requirements

    B3 recognizes several categories that contribute to sustainability. B3 requires certain minimum performance standards across all categories, thus no points are given, ensuring that all requirements receive equal consideration, and none can be completely ignored. In many cases, optional guidelines are provided to allow for pursuit of extra achievements. The B3 guidelines are organized into the following topic categories:

    1. Performance Management
      • Guideline Intent: Facilitate team organization, goal setting, and compliance and outcome tracking processes throughout design, construction, and occupancy.
        1. Guideline Examples:
          • Provide ongoing operations monitoring for at least 10 years after occupancy.
    2. Site and Water
      • Guideline Intent: Restore the ecological integrity of the site to support healthy biodiverse plant, animal, and human communities.
        • Guideline Examples:
          • Establish plant selection and quantities to support and expand existing conservation and native plant and animal species networks.
          • Reduce potable water usage.
          • Reduce and improve quality of stormwater run-off.
          • Provide bird-safe glazing.
    3. Energy and Atmosphere
      • Guideline Intent: Reduce energy use and associated greenhouse gas emissions.
        • Guideline Examples:
          • Design for SB 2030.
          • Provide at least 2% of energy needs through renewable energy.
          • Design for capability of electric vehicle charging equipment.
    4. Indoor Environmental Quality
      • Guideline Intent: Provide high quality indoor environmental conditions to promote occupant health, well-being, and productivity.
        • Guideline Examples:
          • Provide high-performance building skin to control moisture and air leakage.
          • Provide radon control.
          • Provide minimum daylighting levels in occupied spaces.
          • Provide comfortable acoustic environment for occupants.
          • Provide exterior views for occupied spaces.
    5. Materials and Waste
      • Guideline Intent: Reduce embodied environmental impact and toxicity in materials.
        • Guideline Examples:
          • Perform life-cycle assessment to select building materials with least embodied environmental impact on global warming, air and water pollution, energy consumption, and waste.
          • Provide salvaged, recycled content, bio-based, and/or responsibly sourced materials.
          • Provide non-toxic building materials.

    Staff Recommendation

    Meeting B3 requirements helps reduce the overall impact of a new building on the Park District’s sustainability goals (carbon emissions, water consumption, waste generation). Additional measures can be taken to further reduce the sustainability footprint of the building, including the use of grey-water recycling, provision of electric vehicle charging stations, and deconstruction of the existing Visitor Center.

    Specific to the Park District’s goal to reduce carbon emissions, buildings can be designed to be Net-zero energy consumers, and if conditions are right, can produce more energy than they consume, which would further reduce the sustainability footprint of the organization.

    Investment in energy conservation above and beyond B3 has benefits. Energy efficiency and supplemental clean energy pay for themselves over time. Improvements, and in particular solar, can also serve as teaching opportunities similar to what we already do at Richardson Nature Center.

    Staff recommends use of the design process to determine the most effective energy efficiency improvements while examining the return on investment and educational value of those investments. Staff would bring this information back to the Board for consideration once it has been developed.

    Relationship to the System Plan

    The Request for Action supports the following goals(s) of the System Plan:

    • Goal 2: Parks Matter
    • Goal 3: Lead by Example
  • Item 6D. Cooperative Agreement for the Management, Operation, and Maintenance of Hyland Greens Golf Course with the City of Bloomington

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    18 Feb 2021
    CLOSED: This discussion has concluded.

    Superintendent’s Recommendation:

    MOTION TO AUTHORIZE THE BOARD CHAIR AND SUPERINTENDENT TO ENTER INTO A COOPERATIVE AGREEMENT FOR THE MANAGEMENT, OPERATION, AND MAINTENANCE OF HYLAND GREENS GOLF COURSE WITH THE CITY OF BLOOMINGTON, CONTINGENT ON LEGAL COUNSEL REVIEW AND APPROVAL.


    The following information was prepared by Eric Quiring, General Counsel.

    Background:

    The City of Bloomington owns and, in the past, operated Hyland Greens Golf Course. City representatives approached the Park District to see if we would be willing to operate the Golf Course under an agreement similar to our arrangements for Glen Lake Golf Course and Parker’s Lake Driving Range.

    A draft of the proposed Agreement (Reference 6D-1) would allow the Park District to manage, operate, and maintain Hyland Greens for a period of three years, with a three-year renewal period. The Agreement may be canceled by either party at the end of any calendar year by providing sixty days’ written notice. Any deficits in the Hyland Greens fund would be split 50/50 between the parties. After accrual of a fund balance of $150,000 at the end of a calendar year, the Park District would receive 70% of the balance above $150,000 and the City would receive 30% of the balance above $150,000.

    In order to move forward with the Agreement and arrange for operations at the beginning of the golf season, staff recommends authorizing the Board Chair and Superintendent to enter into the Cooperative Agreement, contingent on legal counsel review and approval.


    Relationship to the System Plan

    The Request for Action supports the following goal(s) of the System Plan:

    • Goal 1: You Belong Here
    • Goal 2: Parks Matter
  • Item 6E. Legislative Update

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    18 Feb 2021
    CLOSED: This discussion has concluded.

    Superintendent’s Recommendation:

    NO ACTION REQUIRED; THIS ITEM IS FOR INFORMATION AND DISCUSSION.


    Background:

    The Superintendent (or designee) will provide a verbal update to Commissioners on current Park District legislative initiatives. A copy of the 2021 Legislative Platform is attached (Reference 6E-1) for Commissioners’ reference.


    Relationship to the System Plan

    The Request for Action supports the following goals(s) of the System Plan:

    • Goal 1: You Belong Here
    • Goal 2: Parks Matter
    • Goal 3: Lead by Example