Diamond Lake Regional Trail Master Plan

Share on Facebook Share on Twitter Share on Linkedin Email this link

Three Rivers Park District is beginning the master planning process for future development of a new north-south regional trail through the western portion of Hennepin County. Identified as the Diamond Lake Regional Trail, it will travel 20 miles through Dayton, Rogers, Corcoran, Medina, Long Lake, Orono and Wayzata. The vision for the trail is a 10-foot-wide paved, multi-use trail that will connect natural areas, other regional trails in the Three Rivers system, and local parks and trails. Trail uses include biking, hiking, dog walking, running, and in-line skating.

To view an informational video about the Diamond Lake Regional Trail Master Plan, click here.

As part of the engagement process, we invited the public to make comments about the proposed trail route in an interactive map. Although this part of the engagement process is now closed, you can view the comments we received by clicking on the View the Map link below. If you would like to leave a general comment about the Diamond Lake Regional Trail Master Plan, please leave a comment in the Guest Book below.

The map shows multiple potential trail route options for the Diamond Lake Regional Trail. Each segment may have its unique pros and cons. Ultimately, one preferred route will be determined from this collection of trail segments in the map, based on public and stakeholder input.


View the Map


This master plan project will result in a preferred alignment for the future regional trail. Once approved by the Three Rivers Park District Board of Commissioners and the Metropolitan Council, this master plan will guide the future development of the trail as funding, right-of-way acquisition and local development allows. Trail construction is typically done in multiple phases as funding and development opportunities arise. Final completion may take many years or even decades.


Please email questions about the master plan process to DLRT@threeriversparks.org. For answers to commonly-asked questions about the project, check out this Frequently Asked Questions document.



Three Rivers Park District is beginning the master planning process for future development of a new north-south regional trail through the western portion of Hennepin County. Identified as the Diamond Lake Regional Trail, it will travel 20 miles through Dayton, Rogers, Corcoran, Medina, Long Lake, Orono and Wayzata. The vision for the trail is a 10-foot-wide paved, multi-use trail that will connect natural areas, other regional trails in the Three Rivers system, and local parks and trails. Trail uses include biking, hiking, dog walking, running, and in-line skating.

To view an informational video about the Diamond Lake Regional Trail Master Plan, click here.

As part of the engagement process, we invited the public to make comments about the proposed trail route in an interactive map. Although this part of the engagement process is now closed, you can view the comments we received by clicking on the View the Map link below. If you would like to leave a general comment about the Diamond Lake Regional Trail Master Plan, please leave a comment in the Guest Book below.

The map shows multiple potential trail route options for the Diamond Lake Regional Trail. Each segment may have its unique pros and cons. Ultimately, one preferred route will be determined from this collection of trail segments in the map, based on public and stakeholder input.


View the Map


This master plan project will result in a preferred alignment for the future regional trail. Once approved by the Three Rivers Park District Board of Commissioners and the Metropolitan Council, this master plan will guide the future development of the trail as funding, right-of-way acquisition and local development allows. Trail construction is typically done in multiple phases as funding and development opportunities arise. Final completion may take many years or even decades.


Please email questions about the master plan process to DLRT@threeriversparks.org. For answers to commonly-asked questions about the project, check out this Frequently Asked Questions document.



General Comments

If you have general comments about the Diamond Lake Regional Trail planning process, please share them here.

You need to be signed in to comment in this Guest Book. Click here to Sign In or Register to get involved

Placing a trail through or along a Scientific and Natural Area [where dogs are prohibited, and where undisturbed areas are set aside for scientific research] seems contradictory to the purpose of a SNA. No transportation corridor presently goes along or through Wolsfeld Woods, west of Tamarack. Would introducing a public use trail place any negative impacts on the species and habitats there, especially since nothing exists there now? Do the covenants of the SNA allow for this usage and intrusion? Horseback riding in Wolsfeld Woods is a special privilege not enjoyed in many other SNAs, if any. Is this usage consistent with the spirit of the original establishing of this SNA that does allow for horses? How would horse/bike encounters be minimized and made safe? Given the present situation, where bikes are not allowed, and horses are, would horse be given preference in the planning and these encounters? The SNA has some areas of very steep slopes and erosion; horse riders know to avoid these areas at certain times of the year. How would this trail deal with keeping mountain bikers who presently have no readily gained access to these areas from using these steep slopes, and causing severe erosion? Would the use and condemnation of land from the 2 SNAs result in the need for replacement of the land through the Federal Land and Water Conservation Act? How would dogs and people be prevented from over-use of the area? Has over-use been defined for the SNAs? What would constitute too much usage and pressure, and then what would happen to the trail usage? Because the western Tamarack portion of the trail relies on placing a new transportation corridor adjacent to an SNA, the other Tamarack option, or the Hunter Drive option should be used.
Would there be less visual impact onto private landowner's homes if the trail were to be placed on Hunter vs Tamarack? Would there be less intrusion into resident's actively used land? Would more trees remain to buffer homes from the trail along Hunter or Tamarack?

CWP 11 days ago

After listening in on a couple of meetings and reviewing the comments, I am writing to voice my support for the proposed shared-use trail. I bike regularly around Medina and appreciate the well-maintained trails we have in the area. I have found sharing the trails with other bikers, hikers and skaters to be a largely courteous and respectful exchange. I treasure those parts of the trail where the roar of the traffic is diminished, and the air Is free of exhaust.
I also appreciate the concerns raised by the horse-owners in Medina, several of whom are my neighbors. I support their wishes for allowing enough space so as not to distress their animals or unduly invade their privacy. In the more than 30 years I have been a resident of Medina, I have witnessed how their options for riding trails have become increasingly limited. A few decades ago, an annual foxhunt would sometimes, with our permission, cross a portion of our property. But even the modest level of development since then in the area makes that no longer possible. Some assurance by Three Rivers to preserve or even expand a few riding trail options for horses may help us find the right balance and dispel a legitimate concern that horse-owners are getting crowded out.
Since this project won’t be completed for many years, I may never get the chance to ride on the trail. But us my hope that when some new family moves into my place, they will be able to enjoy the beauty of this area by horse, skate, bike or foot as they choose. And they can practically do it out their back door!

Noel Martinson 17 days ago

I moved to Medina about a year and a half ago to enjoy the beautiful property and privacy. I do NOT support the bike trail. I believe those who bike will still be on the street even if there is a path. I would expect a decrease in my very high property taxes if this path runs down Hunter Drive.

Hunter Drive Resident 18 days ago

Listen to the last meeting I, know there are neighbors that may be opposed to the trail but we are more than thrilled to see a north-south trail we have lived in Medina over 30 years and we are property owners that are along the trail where we have lived for over 20 years we have no problem with this trail running through this edge of our property. Also Medina road is a terrible road for bikers and walkers cars go away over the speed limit and there is no shoulder to ride on or walk on. For years we have dreamed of a. Bike trail or a wider shoulder on Medina Road. We definitely support this long-term project

AKF 21 days ago

Any trail route should follow existing public easements and roads, whenever possible. These routes are currently being used, and will continue to be used by bikers and walkers, regardless of other options. It only makes sense to support those currently-used pathways and to make those pathways safer, rather than engage in the incredibly expensive and extensive construction that would be required through private land acquisition of backyards and private stretches of natural, unpaved wooded and wetland. There is no need to pave paradise.

An expenditure of this size and the potential level of impact on individual landowners require better efforts in the following areas:

• Care taken in informing those directly impacted;
• Efforts to minimize private land impact and the potential for pressured sales and depressed land values from the specter of a bike path passing through private property;
• Clearly-communicated, extensive, and careful justification to the taxpayers , including an overview of what other potential infrastructure projects are not being funded at the expense of supporting the DLT project of this magnitude; and
• Binding, clear, and public commitment to not force sales by private landowners, whether through eminent domain or the potential threat of such activity.

Concerned Medina Resident about 1 month ago

Providing safe pedestrian and bicycle facilities reduces carbon emissions, facilitates physical fitness, enhances communities, and allows people to connect with nature. Projects such as this are priceless in their potential to improve the environment, reduce medical costs through improved physical and mental health, and support communities by connecting people to key destinations (parks, shopping, etc.).

We live near 19 and Baker Park and have experienced the benefits of the nearby trail, and support projects that will benefit our neighboring communities.

Thank you for your vision and hard work.

Medina Resident about 2 months ago

The trail should go though a future park on the south side of Diamond lake. This trail project is years away and that will give the city the time needed to work with the land owners on acquiring the property. This is consistent with Dayton's master plan

Doug Baines 3 months ago

I have lived in Corcoran for almost 34 years and have loved it. I understand that communities grow and change. I appreciate and have enjoyed the Three Rivers Parks. I am having a difficult time understanding the need and plan for this bike trail. I understand the motivation for a north to south route through these communities, but the expense and impact that an asphalt trail would have on nature and the privacy of landowners is not justifiable. I don't understand why TRP would not connect this trail from the northeast with the regional trail along Co.Rd 19. Not only would this be way less expensive, safer and quieter, more "park-like", and it would end at the Luce Line State trail just west of downtown Wayzata. Please consider this idea; you would achieve your trail route goals, have more funds for other projects, and make so many people( bikers and landowners) happy!

kathswans 3 months ago

We are not in favor of trails coming through through our neighborhood, especially around Hackamore Rd in Corcoran. The street is already narrow, windy, and would cause landowners to lose part of their land. We also have a lot of kids in our neighborhood and adding a bike trail with traffic would make it unsafe for them.

Alison 3 months ago

Hello! I am leaving a comment to encourage you to not develop the trail along P
Old Long Lake road near Wayzata Country Club. This is a very narrow road that does not have a lot of room. Cars can tend to go very fast along here and you also have golfers trying to cross the road in two spots. This is not very safe and it would be very disruptive to golfers and possibly even dangerous for people on the trail to be so close to the golf holes. I would ask that you route around this area which I believe is to the west a bit. Thank you.

Safdahl 3 months ago

I am not in favor of the exorbitant trail that is being planned. It involves the taking of private property that private landowners have paid extraordinarily high taxes so THEY can enjoy their own property or sell it and gain some profit. I don't understand why using the shoulders of already established roads won't suffice. At least widening the roads is less intrusive than plowing through wetlands, wooded areas and private citizens backyards.
You are impacting much more wildlife by creating a new path, not to mention storm water run off.
Many roads already do or will have storm water capabilities to accommodate this.
I am against this trail being placed on the West side of Holy Name Lake. The nesting Swans, Eagles, Osprey many ducks and even otters have been able to use this habitat without interference. Currently the lake is flanked by Holy Name Drive, Lakeview Drive, County Rd 24 and the City of Medina Park off Hunter and 24. One more path on the only natural side is overkill and creating traffic on the whole circumference of the lake will be devastating.

S.Sween 4 months ago

The trail is a wonderful addition to the trail system in the region and for the state. We are in favor of the route going up Tamarack ONLY if power lines will be buried and there will not be tree loss along side the road. In order to put in the trail, power lines may need to be moved which will lead to swaths and paths of trees being removed. New trees won't be planted under power lines and will leave a very barren looking road. With the burying of power lines, on far side of trail, trees can be maintained and/or replanted close the trail along side the road and trail where power line is not installed. The cost up front to do this out ways the loss long-term. Look to Bushaway Road in Wayzata where this practice was put into play.

Bridget & Jason Anderson 4 months ago

I used to live in Maple Grove, where I could access miles and miles of beautiful trails just a block from my home. When I moved just 12 miles away to Rogers, I was disappointed to find that I no longer had such access without driving. A trail system where people can walk/run/bike safely is much needed in this area that is quickly growing! Currently, I just make a bunch of tiny loops in my neighborhood because I'm surrounded by busy county roads with not even a shoulder to run on. I would so much rather use trails again. I think connecting Elm Creek park to the Rogers middle/high school and to Crow Hassan would be so beneficial, as well as a connection to Henry's Woods Park. Another comment I saw on here said that it would be great to have a trail in natural areas/away from the busy roads, and I would agree and love to see that wherever it is possible to do so. The path should be wide enough to allow room for both cyclists and pedestrians. It would be great if there could be garbage cans and water fountains somewhere along the route as well.

Tayler 4 months ago

My spouse and I are active users of bike trails and typically ride about 1900 miles each summer. We welcome and are excited about the addition of a new trail. We prefer trails that are quiet and natural. Trails that parallel roads are noisy and distracting. Frequent stops and stop signs also distract from a serene ride. Natural beauty separates a superior trail from an average one. Paved trails are preferable.

Mlundberg 4 months ago

We do not support this trail. First, I question the amount of tax dollars being spent. Is the planning team attempting to put in a "cadillac" when a "chevy" would suffice? I was told by the planning team their goal is a "park setting." To my thinking, this attitude will greatly increase the cost. Are our county\state budgets really in such great shape that we afford this attitude? Aren't there higher priorities for tax dollars? Like highways, freeways, bridges? I don't disagree with trails in general but this proposed trail sounds off the charts from a dollars perspective.
Second, we strongly disagree with the proposed route down Hackamore Road in Medina for numerous reasons. If planners have looked at the logistics of this area, they should have concluded there is no room to add a trail along this narrow gravel road with wetland on both sides of some stretches of the road. It is not workable without taking private land, which will not be offered for a trail. Additionally, a county-wide trail should not be routed through a residential neighborhood for the obvious reasons already stated in numerous other comments (loss of security, privacy, tranquility, etc.) Planners really need to consider what they are asking of private property owners along some of the proposed routes.

Medinarez 4 months ago

Please do not make the trail loop around through the wetlands south of the Enclave neighborhood in Medina. As a resident in one of these homes the trail would border, we are extremely opposed to this. We bought this house believing there would never be anything behind us but undeveloped wetland. Also as a mom of a child who has Down syndrome we would not like pathway so close to our house because like many children with Down syndrome he is a bolter/runner and the wetland grass has always been a buffer to keep him safe from the roadways and strangers. Please consider keeping it on Hunter road. We love that there will be a trail but not right in our backyards. Thank you for your consideration.

Patti 4 months ago

I recommend that the trail be kept away from the traffic as much as possible. The trails I enjoy are ones on which I can ride my bike and look off at the ever changing MN scenery. The trails that leave me cold are one that just parallels a highway. If we’re building trails just to get somewhere, then we already have plenty of roads to allow that. But instead if the trail is to be part of an overall vision of an integrated parks and trails system, then the trail should be more like a park and less like a highway

Longhaultrucker 4 months ago

Please consider providing safe trail connections from the Rogers neighborhoods, particularly south and west of 94. Also critical is freeway bridge or tunnel crossing. The county roads in the area are not at all safe for bike travel as-is. It would be a shame to get this wonderful trail but still have to drive to access. Please prioritize connecting to Elm Creek and existing Maple Grove trails, as I believe that would be more useful than routing over to the west by Crow-Hassan and the Lake Independence Regional Trail which isn't as scenic and is near busy roads for much of travel.

caribouluvr 4 months ago

We oppose this trail route option because it goes through very private and secluded land and it puts too great a burden on these neighbors, who also oppose this plan, and who were not informed of the plan or the public meeting. We generally support trail expansion and we are trail users. We would support the Tamarack route, with conditions.

Rena and John Turnham 4 months ago

We generally support trail expansion and we are trail uses. However, we oppose the trail route option that goes through very private and secluded land as it puts too great a burden on our near neighbors--this is the route option that goes nearest to Wolsfeld Woods and affects these residents: Crosby, Wahlfor and Ringer. We would support the Tamarack route, with conditions.

Rena and John Turnham 4 months ago