Diamond Lake Regional Trail Master Plan

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Current Engagement Opportunities

Orono and Long Lake

As a result of the changes to the regional trail route through Medina, Three Rivers is evaluating a new regional trail route through the cities of Long Lake and Orono. The new route would build off existing local trail segments between the Luce Line State Trail and Lake Independence Regional Trail to ultimately connect Baker Park Reserve and the Dakota Rail Regional Trail in downtown Wayzata. As a multiuse trail, the trail would allow biking, walking, hiking, running, inline skating and more, and ultimately will be owned, operated and maintained by Three Rivers.

While the trail route will go through the cities of Wayzata, Orono and Long Lake, this engagement phase is focused only on the trail route between the Luce Line State Trail and Lake Independence Regional Trail in Orono and Long Lake. The rest of the route utilizes existing regional or state trails or has already received initial support from the respective city councils.

There are two options under consideration for east Long Lake, both of which use existing local trails. One option is along County Road 112/Wayzata Boulevard and the other is along the north side of the Hwy. 12 sound wall. For western Long Lake and Orono, the trail is proposed to follow the existing or planned local trails along County Road 112/Wayzata Boulevard except for the short segment between Martha Lane and Lake Street. For this segment, the trail is proposed to follow the existing bike route along Martha Lane, Symes Street and Lake Street and may include on-street/share the road conditions.

While this route is still being planned as part of the Diamond Lake Regional Trail corridor planning efforts, it will ultimately function as an independent regional trail and likely will be renamed as part of the master plan.

Community members are encouraged to share their feedback through Monday, July 5, on the interactive map below or at an outdoor open house or virtual community meeting.

One-on-one outdoor or virtual meetings can also be requested via email to DLRT@threeriversparks.org or phone to Stephen Shurson, Three Rivers Project Manager, at 763-559-6766.


View and Comment on the Orono/Long Lake Map


Project Background and Status Updates

Three Rivers Park District is leading a master planning process for the Diamond Lake Regional Trail - a new north-south regional trail through the western portion of Hennepin County. The regional trail is envisioned to travel 20 miles near the communities of Dayton, Rogers, Corcoran, Medina, Long Lake, Orono and Wayzata, and connect natural areas, parks and trails. The 10-foot-wide paved, multi-use trail will allow biking, hiking, dog walking, running, and in-line skating.

The goal of the master planning process is to identify one preferred route spanning the entire corridor which is both publicly and politically supported. To accomplish this, Three Rivers and its city partners identified multiple routes through each community in early 2020 and commenced a robust evaluation and public engagement process.

Some communities have selected or are nearing the point of selecting a preferred route through their community, and other communities have asked for additional routes to be considered that better address their local community goals (see above for Current Engagement Opportunities). In addition, it may be necessary for Three Rivers to also consider and study routes that extend beyond the cities currently being studied.

For quick reference, the preferred route planning status for each community is summarized on this map.

A detailed, interactive map for all routes under consideration is available here.

After a preferred route is approved for the entire corridor, Three Rivers will prepare a draft master plan highlighting the agreed-upon route, anticipated costs, acquisition needs, development goals and projected use. The draft master plan will be available for additional public review upon completion and prior to being formally considered for approval by the local communities, Three Rivers Park District Board of Commissioners and the Metropolitan Council.

Following master plan approval, Three Rivers will work to secure funding and work with willing sellers and partners to secure required property rights and commence trail construction. Trail construction will occur in multiple phases as funding and development opportunities allow and will likely take two to three decades to fully achieve.

To view an informational video about the Diamond Lake Regional Trail Master Plan, click here.

Please email questions about the master plan process to DLRT@threeriversparks.org. For answers to commonly-asked questions about the project, check out this Frequently Asked Questions document.

Current Engagement Opportunities

Orono and Long Lake

As a result of the changes to the regional trail route through Medina, Three Rivers is evaluating a new regional trail route through the cities of Long Lake and Orono. The new route would build off existing local trail segments between the Luce Line State Trail and Lake Independence Regional Trail to ultimately connect Baker Park Reserve and the Dakota Rail Regional Trail in downtown Wayzata. As a multiuse trail, the trail would allow biking, walking, hiking, running, inline skating and more, and ultimately will be owned, operated and maintained by Three Rivers.

While the trail route will go through the cities of Wayzata, Orono and Long Lake, this engagement phase is focused only on the trail route between the Luce Line State Trail and Lake Independence Regional Trail in Orono and Long Lake. The rest of the route utilizes existing regional or state trails or has already received initial support from the respective city councils.

There are two options under consideration for east Long Lake, both of which use existing local trails. One option is along County Road 112/Wayzata Boulevard and the other is along the north side of the Hwy. 12 sound wall. For western Long Lake and Orono, the trail is proposed to follow the existing or planned local trails along County Road 112/Wayzata Boulevard except for the short segment between Martha Lane and Lake Street. For this segment, the trail is proposed to follow the existing bike route along Martha Lane, Symes Street and Lake Street and may include on-street/share the road conditions.

While this route is still being planned as part of the Diamond Lake Regional Trail corridor planning efforts, it will ultimately function as an independent regional trail and likely will be renamed as part of the master plan.

Community members are encouraged to share their feedback through Monday, July 5, on the interactive map below or at an outdoor open house or virtual community meeting.

One-on-one outdoor or virtual meetings can also be requested via email to DLRT@threeriversparks.org or phone to Stephen Shurson, Three Rivers Project Manager, at 763-559-6766.


View and Comment on the Orono/Long Lake Map


Project Background and Status Updates

Three Rivers Park District is leading a master planning process for the Diamond Lake Regional Trail - a new north-south regional trail through the western portion of Hennepin County. The regional trail is envisioned to travel 20 miles near the communities of Dayton, Rogers, Corcoran, Medina, Long Lake, Orono and Wayzata, and connect natural areas, parks and trails. The 10-foot-wide paved, multi-use trail will allow biking, hiking, dog walking, running, and in-line skating.

The goal of the master planning process is to identify one preferred route spanning the entire corridor which is both publicly and politically supported. To accomplish this, Three Rivers and its city partners identified multiple routes through each community in early 2020 and commenced a robust evaluation and public engagement process.

Some communities have selected or are nearing the point of selecting a preferred route through their community, and other communities have asked for additional routes to be considered that better address their local community goals (see above for Current Engagement Opportunities). In addition, it may be necessary for Three Rivers to also consider and study routes that extend beyond the cities currently being studied.

For quick reference, the preferred route planning status for each community is summarized on this map.

A detailed, interactive map for all routes under consideration is available here.

After a preferred route is approved for the entire corridor, Three Rivers will prepare a draft master plan highlighting the agreed-upon route, anticipated costs, acquisition needs, development goals and projected use. The draft master plan will be available for additional public review upon completion and prior to being formally considered for approval by the local communities, Three Rivers Park District Board of Commissioners and the Metropolitan Council.

Following master plan approval, Three Rivers will work to secure funding and work with willing sellers and partners to secure required property rights and commence trail construction. Trail construction will occur in multiple phases as funding and development opportunities allow and will likely take two to three decades to fully achieve.

To view an informational video about the Diamond Lake Regional Trail Master Plan, click here.

Please email questions about the master plan process to DLRT@threeriversparks.org. For answers to commonly-asked questions about the project, check out this Frequently Asked Questions document.

General Comments

If you have general comments about the Diamond Lake Regional Trail planning process, please share them here.

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Would love to see a trail system throughout Rogers to provide safe walking and biking! We lack easy ways to navigate through nature like our neighboring cities have, and would greatly benefit from this plan

MD09 about 1 year ago

Would love to have the vision to bring Three Rivers trails through Rogers to fruition with this project. A stop at Henry's Woods is a must. Safe pedestrian corridors like this trail are what will help connect our community of Rogers to the Three Rivers ecosystem. Great work!

Peter M about 1 year ago

We do not want a paved trail going through the woods and destroying the wetlands on the south side of our property in Hassan Hills. It could easily go around this area and it could easily be preserved. We would like to see the landscape left as natural as possible with little destruction.

D. Hallman about 1 year ago

My family would love a trail going through Rogers. I see so many kids biking in areas without sidewalks. Rogers needs this!

Kristen Worwa about 1 year ago

I frequently travel from Rogers to Medina taking Cty Rd 101. It is a beautiful stretch of MN but there is no easy or safe way to bike this area. I often see people biking directly on 101 and it looks very dangerous. I would love for the trail to be built following 101, and for the north end of the trail to go through Rogers near Brockton.

klickshan about 1 year ago

I support this trail. Rogers has next to zero outdoor recreation/walking/bike trails. I'd love to be able to commute via bike and have a safer place for my family to bike and hike. I agree with the idea of bridges to protect some natural areas.

Ag about 1 year ago

I would love for the trail to go through Rogers so we have a place to bike ride with the family without worrying about traffic! Thank you

Dsmith about 1 year ago

My husband and I are leisure road bike buffs and are delighted to see a plan for a path right outside our back door! We’ve ridden many miles to and from the different regional trails and of course Elm
Creek since we moved here in 1999 and as the population has grown so has the secondary road traffic. We would definitely use the trail versus the road from our home to another system link because both county rd 144, Brockton Ln/113, and 81 are not safe at all for bikers or walkers. We are 110% in favor of the trail having a direct path from the schools to all the housing additions on the 144 corridor. We don’t know the details of the plan but would not be in favor of including any sort of privacy wall or fencing. It looks so unnatural and tacky at an additional expense.

tvazque1 about 1 year ago

Please consider going through Rogers!!! We have horrible to no bile trails here. Had a tragic bike vs car accident last year. Need safer trails, thank you in advance! Psst (Start the trail in Rogers)

Beth about 1 year ago

Yes please, my family supports this fully! Have been waiting for this since 1996 when we moved here! So excited

Beth about 1 year ago

I have been down this road with the Three Rivers Parks Board before. They gather data and input...but discard what what they don't want to acknowledge. Case in point, their insistence on putting paved trails through Crow-Hassan, the last untouched, pristine, wheels-free park in the District. Despite overwhelming feedback against, they are moving forward, which is a pretty clear indicator of how much they value public comment.

The Diamond Lake Regional Trail seems like more of the same. Gather input so they can check the box, but having no intention of using anything not supporting their position.

This corridor, which supports the Met Council's agenda of an extended paved trail system around and through the metro, is one more in a long list of great options for bikers passing through. But what about those of us who live along the proposed route? We trade amenities we'd love to have (broadband internet anyone?) for space to raise our kids and our animals and to see wildlife on a daily basis.

Can you just leave one little corner of the world unpaved, please?

Mary about 1 year ago

I was really disturbed after meeting with the Three Rivers staff in Hamel recently. 1) My property has a proposed route on 2 borders and will be about 20 yards from my front door. Yet, I did not receive a notice about the meeting. I found out from another community member. How many other people who are against this trail were excluded? Do they only invite people they think we will support the trail? 2) The staff could not answer my question about why they want to build the bike trail. One person said it was so families and the elderly would have a safe place to walk and ride. Another said it would be a "destination" trail. A third said it would be to get bikers off the roads. It seems like if we are going to spend so many taxpayer dollars, we should know why. 3) I was told the cost of this trail will be $75 million. For a bike trail? Seriously? However, when you start looking at the land they want to purchase and the infrastructure they will need to put in place to cross busy roads and wetlands, it adds up quickly. With our economy as it is, it seems like there is a better way to spend that money. 4) Though they don't use eminent domain, they were clear that your neighbor can sell and they can put the trail next to your property line. So while you may not be a willing seller, it doesn't do much good if your neighbor is.

I have really enjoyed he Three Rivers parks and trails over the years. However, the Diamond Lake Regional Trail is not what is needed. It will do little to improve congestion on our roads. (One staff member admitted that he did not think serious bikers who use the roads now would move to the trail.) The western routes are nowhere close to families and areas of denser populations and they don't link up our existing parks. There are few consistent answers related to this trail. After my recent experience with the Three Rivers staff, I feel even worse about this trail than I did before.

NatureLover about 1 year ago

I understand that people are looking to come out of the immediate metro area to build and raise families. While I like to see less developments coming this direction, I know it is inevitable and accept that. My hope on that is it slows way down. But the proposed bike path cutting through our family farm fields to make a more beautiful, scenic ride for some is not something I support one bit. Those fields pay our bills (insurance, taxes, and repairs) and feed our animals. And a bike path will not stop us from driving over them with farm equipment to plow, plant, and spread manure. Love to see how many people will use this path and find appealing once the pig and cow manure is spread. And in Spring and Fall, those paths will be covered in dirt and debris from planting and harvesting. I'm sorry but to cut right through someone's land/business is hurtful to our family.

SSCHMIDT about 1 year ago

Consider making wooden/cement boardwalks over wetlands en route instead of Importing land for paved trails. Elm creek park has a bridge like that. The point being to disrupt the local ecosystem as little as possible.

Grant Johnson about 1 year ago

I appreciate a good trail, but I beg of you to consider not taking these trails through private back yards. I’m talking specifically about the one proposal of cutting through the yards of several Tuckborough Farms and Tuckborough Ridge homes (near Hunter, Tamarack, Navajo in Medina). There are so many trees, wetlands, wildlife, etc that will all be disrupted by a trail. Also the privacy and security of the neighborhood is at risk. I sincerely hope you choose another path. Private yards are no place for public trails. Thank you.

Concerned Neighbor about 1 year ago

I go on bike rides in the Medina, west Plymouth area multiple times per week so would greatly appreciate having a better trail option in this area. There are very few good east west connections between trails in this area resulting in more cyclists on roads and highways. I am still greatly interested in having a closer north/south route like the Diamond Lake regional trail.

Jcbiker77 about 1 year ago

Could you look at extending the Diamond Lake Regional Trail around the area of Hwy 101, near the 4 corners of Plymouth, Medina, Corcoran and Maple Grove? This area is really lacking in biking and walking trails. Thank you!

CJ And about 1 year ago

I am not a current resident of Wayzata, but drive in from North Ferndale daily. I feel strongly that the provided routes for coming through Wayzata are both terrible. There must be a better option. Ferndale is a Historic, tree lined road (especially between Wayzata Blvd. and Lake Street). Additionally, it is a very steep, which could potentially lead to many high speed issues at the intersection of Lake and Ferndale. This intersection is already clogged: cars (from multiple directions), trains and pedestrians merge from all different directions. Barry Avenue has some similar issues; hills that could potentially cause high speed collisions, and this options includes a route coming down North Ferndale. Honestly, where on Barry are you going to put a 10 foot paved trail???). Wayzata has already become a concrete jungle. What about the path following the 15 West exit ramp off off Wayzata Blvd? I encourage you to find more options and remove downtown Wayzata from the proposed options entirely.

Biker, mother, and concerned citizen about 1 year ago

As much as possible, connect Diamond Lake Regional Trail to the trail networks within the other Three River Park AND the Regional Trail network. Therefore, Elm Creek PR to Crow Hassan PR to Lake Rebecca PR to Baker PR, etc.

MarkPR about 1 year ago

This is a good idea for a route not now readily usable without riding on a rather highly used county road(s). It would be nice if there were a map available that showed the route options without all of the comments.
Thanks, Dennis

Dennis about 1 year ago
Page last updated: 24 June 2021, 10:00